Thursday, June 5, 2014

#YesAllWomen

We need to have a serious conversation. It is 2014 and we (meaning us women) are still fighting for equal rights.  Equal rights with respect, the workplace, a relationship, in every aspect of our goddamn life.  As a young woman attending college, it sickens me to believe that though I am getting the same amount of work as my male counterparts, that I still might not make as much money as them in the workforce.  It sickens me that I have to worry about if I want to go out on a walk alone, never mind if that walk god forbid be at night.


It's 2014.

Why are girls still being critiqued for wearing shorts in school?
Why can we not wear something nice without it being assumed it's for the enjoyment of a man?
Why are we as women afraid to go out by ourselves?
...and why can women not go a day without being catcalled on the street?
Why does my mother constantly call women whores if they show a little skin?
Why do women hate on other women?
...and why do we idealize not being like other girls?
Why am I expected to give you something if I'm friendly to you?
...and why am I more expected to do so when I've had a few drinks?
Why does being nice assumed to be flirting?
Why do I have to worry about saying no to you?
...whether that's a date, a kiss, sex, a drink, what have you.
Why do I know too many women who are victims of rape and sexual assault?
WHY do I know that none of these men who committed these crimes were charged?



Feminism is not a female issue.  It is not a male issue.  Feminism is a gender issue.  Feminism isn't saying that women are greater than men.  We do not want to be greater than men.  We want equality.  In the land of the free, it seems silly to say we are still fighting for freedom.  But when you remember we are a country formed by white male slave owners, it begins to make a lot more sense.

WAKE UP ALREADY.
It's stories like the one I heard about the young male student who was raped by his teacher that makes feminism that much more necessary.  The boy was traumatized, but his male counterparts say he should "man up" and should have enjoyed it.  When women were told about the events, they fought for the boy.

I hate being this angry, but this issue feels even more evident (if that is even possible) this week.  Recently, I went to my local Target to pick up acne medication of all things, and this boy followed me and my friend to the respective line we waited in.  This boy glared at me and my friend and obviously making us uneasy.  The cashier is asking me respective questions that cashiers generally ask with a purchase and this fucking kid keeps talking over us and eventually says how pretty I am and asks my age.  I respond with none of your business and walk off.  His response? "oh harsh."  My main problem with this?  It isn't his business how old I am. I do not know you, you're making me uncomfortable, you are not entitled to know anything.



Too many times have I been with friends of mine who are female, and we have been catcalled when walking down the street.  I recall screaming back "catcalling is not a form of flattery."  However why is that when I walk with a guy friend or a boyfriend, that catcalls go away?

Why am I bitch because I know what I want?
Why am I bossy because I like to take charge?
Why are these same traits known as confidence in a man?
Why is it that the thing men fear most about going to prison, women fear walking down the street?

Some other problems include the fact that young girls are taught to yell fire instead of yelling rape. The bigger problem is that we don't teach young boys not to rape. If my dog can learn how to sit and he doesn't speak, boys can learn to keep their penis in their pants.


I'm not saying all men are terrible.  I love many men in my life.  I love my father. I love my male friends. I've been in love with a man before. I've seen men do great things for women and for the feminist movement. I want all my counterparts to have equality.  I want males who don't fall into the white, straight, cis category to have the same opportunities as the stereotype.  I want my transgender and my gender neutral counterparts to not be looked up and down like there's something wrong with them.  I want my fellow sisters to not be criticized for the color of their skin, their education level, their religious beliefs, anything that defines them for who they are.

I'm just saying I am not a fearful woman. Do not make me one. I am strong. I am intelligent. I am educated. I want the same treatment as everyone else.  It is 2014. Why is this concept still so hard?

Much Love,
Lea

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